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Thread: Scepter gas can parts

                  
   
   
   
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Beaverton Oregon
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    595

    Default Scepter gas can parts

    Scepter gas can parts can be ordered from here:
    https://dstactical.com/index.php

    Toy Man

  2. #2

    Default Specialized Wrench to open/close Scepter fuel gas MFC cans

    This was designed by a friend of mine. If you use Scepter fuel gas cans and have a hard time getting the caps on tightly enough (or back off), this may be something you are interested in. Designed to exacting specifications and with meticulous attention to detail, these are of excellent quality, and the only place they're available.

    He was frustrated that the tool the company recommended did not work the way he wanted, so designed his own.

    Scepter Military Fuel Gas Can MFC Cap WRENCH - eBay (item 130492044258 end time Mar-29-11 17:01:33 PDT)

    I hope this helps someone!
    Diane

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Beaverton Oregon
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    595

    Default

    Very nice but a little too pricey for me.

    Toy Man

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for checking it out!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Yakima, WA
    Posts
    3,010

    Default

    I recently ordered four used military surplus Scepter fuel containers (heavy duty plastic jerry cans). They were originally used for diesel so I need to change the cap gaskets to a Viton type. Evidently you can get away with using the diesel gasket as long as you only carry gasoline for short periods of time and store the cans empty. I plan on using them to store gas for long periods of time so have contacted a less expensive source for the gaskets - $4.50 each:

    Tom Musselman, asitom@atlanticbbn.net
    You have to send him a check and he will mail the gaskets

    Most of the commercial sources for Scepter parts have dried up and private source prices have gone sky-high. As examples, check out the price of spouts at D S Tactical and the cap wrench that "rockwear" was telling us about. I would really like to have those items, but just how much money can I justify spending on gas cans???

    I have also been looking at Rotopax and Kolpin containers as an alternative to jerry cans. Still haven't decided on which style to use, but Scepter cans are easier to handle for everyday use.
    Last edited by Jerry; 03-05-2011 at 08:32 AM.
    Jerry
    Exploring PNW Backroads
    K7PNW

  6. #6
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    Aug 2007
    Location
    Beaverton Oregon
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    Default

    I have/am switching to the RotoPax containers.

    Toy Man

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Yakima, WA
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    Default

    Just out of curiosity, Dick, how many gallons does the Xterra tank hold and what is your range on the stock tank? Do you plan on carrying two 4-gallon RotoPax containers? My truck uses more gas than the X so I need to carry extra gas in order to keep up. Worst case scenario my truck gets 10 mpg making for a 250 mile range. I was planning on carrying an additional 8-10 gallons, but if the SUV's will be packing extra gas then I will have to increase that amount.
    Jerry
    Exploring PNW Backroads
    K7PNW

  8. #8
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    Aug 2007
    Location
    Beaverton Oregon
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    how many gallons does the Xterra tank hold and what is your range on the stock tank? Do you plan on carrying two 4-gallon RotoPax containers? My truck uses more gas than the X so I need to carry extra gas in order to keep up. Worst case scenario my truck gets 10 mpg making for a 250 mile range. I was planning on carrying an additional 8-10 gallons, but if the SUV's will be packing extra gas then I will have to increase that amount.
    The Xterra has a 21 gallon tank. I probably get about 12 MPG in desert (??). I have 3 two gal. RotoPax containers.

    I usually carry two of them, might carry all 3 for the OR/ID/NV trip. I'm not too worried if gas is available in Riddle,
    especially if we gas up in McDermitt.

    Or then again I might carry 7.5 gal. in 3 small Scepters.

    You should carry an extra 20 gallons then you could be the tanker truck... LOL

    Dick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Yakima, WA
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    Jeez, mine is already the freighter truck, carrying my fat a$$ around. Seriously, if I carry an extra 10 gallons we should be about equal. My reason for asking is that I plan on buying or fabricating a swing-away tire carrier with room for Scepter gas cans or RotoPax containers. I am leaning toward the Scepter cans as they are easier to store year-around in the garden shed; a little more utilitarian than the odd shape of RotoPax containers. Class is still out on which I will choose, but I had better make up my mind soon because I have already started discussions with a friend who will do the fabricating.

    PS Bet I'll kick myself for not having that nifty Scepter cap wrench. Better keep my options open.
    Last edited by Jerry; 03-05-2011 at 01:28 PM.
    Jerry
    Exploring PNW Backroads
    K7PNW

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry View Post
    ... if I carry an extra 10 gallons we should be about equal. My reason for asking is that I plan on buying or fabricating a swing-away tire carrier with room for Scepter gas cans or RotoPax containers...Class is still out on which I will choose, but I had better make up my mind soon because I have already started discussions with a friend who will do the fabricating.
    I am not real sure of the application, but if it is the vehicle that you have pictured in your avatar, I'd like to suggest another option.

    A little background... I did have a swing away spare tire carrier on my last truck , Thunder II. I worked great and was a fantastic place to mount a sprayer for hand washing as well as a place to hang the Trasharoo. I opted not to mount gas cans to it for a few reasons.

    #1- Out of sight, out of mind. No matter how securely you mount them, they are still in view of those who might want to take the fuel. As the price approaches $5 that becomes a big chunk of change hanging on the back. Plastic cans are vulnerable to something as silly as vandalism. A good sharp knife could create a hazardous situation. Many carry rock hammers , punch a hole and catch it in another can.

    #2- Heat of the day. Exposed to the sun and dirt on the back of a vehicle. In the high desert changes in temperature can be extreme. Freezing at night and baking in the day. The best can in the world will crunch and swell to the point of leakage eventually. Stopping to relieve pressure at mid day gets old. Cleaning off a layer of silt and then having it all over yourself when you fill the rig is tiresome too.

    #3- Safe fill. To safely fill a portable gas container (one that is not properly grounded as a part of the vehicle) It MUST be placed on the ground to fill. The filling nozzle must remain in contact with the container during the filling process. Plastic cans can be more prone to static discharge, but metal can do it too. IT CAN AND DOES HAPPEN. I have personally put out three such fires. The pumps , vehicle and in one case the person were seriously damaged. Be prepared to remove those containers from the rack each time you fill them. Those who do not are tempting fate.

    #4- COG. While rack mounts are lower than a roof mount it is still above the level of other tanks on the vehicle. Anything you can do to lower the center of gravity is an advantage.

    #5- Travel abroad. I have been told that portable fuel containers must be empty for border crossings. Built in tanks are not usually questioned. I want to have plenty of fuel to get far away from the border before dark. border towns can be troublesome , or so I am told.

    I'd mention that they are exposed on the back to a vehicle accident, but they are high enough and the newer containers are extremely durable. I don't see them as a hazard.

    OK, now that I have given you some words of discouragement, you do need to increase your range by carrying extra fuel. A fuel tank underneath where the spare tire hangs is a great option, IMO. Here are several links to look through, three of which I have done:
    Expeditions West: Toyota Tacoma Auxiliary Fuel Tank System
    Auxilary Fuel Tank
    Avalanche - BLT Offroad (scroll down toward the end of the page)

    A very "factory like" transfer tank install can be done inexpensively.
    The convenience is refreshing. At a glance I know how much fuel that I have remaining. I can keep the main tank topped off at all times and keep a couple gallons in reserve.
    In a pinch I have a fuel pump that can be adapted to get me going should the main pump fail.
    550-600 miles range is the sweet spot. This offers range far enough to not have to buy fuel in those price gouging out of the way stops. I have done many trips with auxiliary tanks and others with fuel cans. 15-20 gallons of additional fuel is the best choice for the traveling in my experience. Packing four five gallon cans takes up quite a bit of space and is kind of a pain.
    At one point I had a range over 800 with three fuel tanks. Carrying that extra 20 gallons was just not needed and I removed the third tank.
    I have seen expedition vehicles with fuel cans stacked all over the vehicle. I still have a dozen old "jerry cans" and half a dozen mounts for them. I should probably sell them as I find the auxiliary fuel tank much less trouble to store.

    Now to address the swinging spare tire carrier:
    I had one for many years. It was handy and added a "cool" factor. More often than not it was in the way to open the back. Swung out when not properly latched, or in the way when I needed to haul something with the gate open. On the latest vehicle I have made a conscious decision to avoid the swinging spare tire carrier on the back. Yea, yeah, I know all the cool expo rigs have them.

    You could easily get $1000 invested in a swing away rear mount. That is a pretty big investment. It would be less than half that for a fuel tank under the back and a basket for the roof rack. The tank under my Avalanche came in under $150 installed.

    I still have issues to resolve now that I no longer have a rear rack. Carrying the spare underneath may not be a viable option. Putting it in the roof basket may be my best option even though the COG will be affected.
    A basket to carry the spare on top can easily be done for most vehicles.
    A place to mount the sprayer/hand washer and Trasharoo are still items to figure out. If my trailer is behind us this is less of an issue.

    Kind of a long post. Sorry. I did wish to relay my experiences and give you some food for thought.
    "Speed doesn't kill, suddenly becoming stationary does." - Richard Hammond

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